Bastille Blouse: Simplicity 2372

15 Jul

Bastille Day was a few days ago but I still thought it was a fitting name for this pretty little red-and-blue print blouse. This was a last chance go at Simplicity 2372. I made the jacket a couple of weeks back and was a bit disappointed with the finished product. I was all set to throw the pattern away if this blouse didn’t suit but, consider it and it’s pretty pleats, redeemed.

I began cutting it out after a long day facilitating an 8 hour group session at work, which in hindsight was not such good thinking on my part. It takes quite a long time as you need to mark all the pleats on the sleeves and neckline and the pattern matching but I got through it, took it over to the machine to begin sewing when insanity struck. I’d lost my right back piece.

I thought I was going nuts – I sew in my lounge/kitchen area that is not that big and I’m the only one here but I couldn’t find it any where. I knew I had definitely I cut it as I had matched the left back to it using the fabulous instructions that Tasia, of sewaholic, had posted a couple of days ago. I went through all my scraps, I went through my drawers. I am not kidding – I actually looked in the fridge thinking maybe in my over-tired brain might have absent-mindedly put it in there. No such luck. All I can think of is that maybe I mindlessly cut the facings out of it. The thing was, this fabric had been in my stash since last year, so no chance of getting more. I went to bed demoralised.

In the morning I had a brainwave – a sacrifice could be made for this blouse. From deep in a box I pulled out the New Look 6180 dress from the last post. I hadn’t worn it more than once in the time since I’d made it so I removed the zip from the center back, ripped the seam open, took a deep breath and crossed my fingers that enough fabric remained to cut the missing piece.

Yes, thanks to those unflattering insubstantial bust darts, the project was back on.

The top has a centre front and centre back seam so I matched the front pieces but added 2 inches to each back piece so I could turn it into a back fastened blouse. I found some navy snaps which looked interesting and I’d never used them before. It was a bit of an experiment but I’m happy with how it came out.

For each snap there are four parts: a backing piece with sharp prongs, a stud, a socket, and a right-side piece with more sharp prongs. The set came with a double ended tool for application.

First I measured out the placement. I had 8 snaps and I marked each one with a pin.

Then I placed the backing piece under the fabric, allowing the prongs to poke through. I found it helps to spread the fabric taut with one hand.

You use the slim end of the tool to force the fabric onto the prongs.

The stud is placed on top.

With the big end of the tool stabilising the stud you whack the end a good 5 or so times with a hammer.

Ta-da! Repeat on the other edge with facing and socket.

I love this fabric and I’m so glad the pattern wasn’t a waste of time.

TOTAL COST:

Fabric: $0 (from stash – originally from Spotlight)

Pattern: $0 (from stash – previous outing here)

Snaps: $4.99

Total Cost: NZ$4.99 / US$3.60

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3 Responses to “Bastille Blouse: Simplicity 2372”

  1. Brumby July 16, 2010 at 10:21 #

    Love the colours! I don’t often use snaps but when I do I always think it is kind of funny to combine a hammer into the normally delicate art of sewing.

  2. Sherry July 18, 2010 at 20:20 #

    This is gorgeous fabric – just as well you managed to salvage your top!

  3. lillian turner July 22, 2010 at 01:25 #

    Glad you are into recycling also. Blouse looks great

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